Thursday, July 30, 2015

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

I have collected so many recipes over the years, but the ones I have kept the longest were from college--from  roommates or classes or church homemaking activities.  This is a favorite every time I make it--which isn't often enough.  Everyone raves about it.  I had never even heard of rhubarb until Mom Metzger made it for Sunday dessert when I went home with my roommate, Cindy, over break.  I was like, "That looks like celery, but it's red.  Is it a fruit or a vegetable?" (that's probably not what I actually said.  It was 1980.  Who remembers?) was amazing.  I made the pie a few days ago and decided I needed to know what kind of food this was.  Check out the collage below for the answer.

1 qt. rhubarb, cut up into 1/2" little chunks 
3/4 - 1 cup sugar
1/2 t. cinnamon
1/4 cup tapioca
3-oz. strawberry Jell-O
about 1/4 - 1/2 cup of water

1.  Mix everything but the Jell-O together in a large saucepan and bring to a boil.
2.  Add the Jell-O and stir to evenly combine.  
3.  Pour into prepared pie crust. Dot with butter, if desired.
4.  Place top crust over pie and flute the edges to seal.
5.  Cut slits in top crust to vent.
6.  Bake 40 minutes at 425 F.
7.  Cool in refrigerator.

*Note:  the filling may boil over a bit so be sure to have something under your pie to catch any drippings.

Source: Cindy Wilson's Mom in Buhl, Idaho, 1980.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Rosemary Olive Oil Bread

Sometimes I just forget about Pinterest.  Can you even fathom that?  And really, that is not a bad thing.  But once in a while I will go to my boards and find something that I really want to try.  This week it is this yummy bread--reminiscent of the bread at Macaroni Grill.  Just sayin'.  When I made this tonight, I put together a little "Italian Salsa" to dip the bread in, just like in a restaurant.  When we lived El Paso, Texas,  we went to another Italian place called Johnny Carino's--best Chicken Scaloppini on the planet, by the way--and when the waiter brought out the bread, he poured some olive oil in a little plate, added a little balsamic vinegar and some herbs and BAM!  He called it Italian Salsa.  You know because we were in Mexican salsa territory.  Get it?

1 cup warm water (100-110 degrees F)
1 T. sugar
2 t. active dry yeast
1 t. salt
2 T. fresh rosemary, chopped (you can use 2 t. dried, instead)
1/4 t. Italian seasoning
1/4 t. black pepper
2 T. extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour 
1/2 cup bread flour, plus extra for kneading
1 egg, whisked with 1 T. water, for egg wash
dried rosemary for sprinkling on top

1.  In a large bowl, combine the warm water, sugar and yeast.  Let sit 10 minutes to proof.

2.  Stir in the salt, fresh rosemary, seasonings, olive oil, and whole wheat flour.  Add the bread flour and stir until the dough forms a ball.  Knead on a lightly floured surface for about 5 minutes, adding in more flour to prevent sticking and for a smooth dough.

3.  Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl; cover and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

4.  Punch down the dough and form into a round loaf.  Place on a cornmeal dusted pizza peel or parchment paper (I used this), cover and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.

5.  Meanwhile, preheat oven and a pizza stone to 400 degrees F.  When the dough has risen, gently brush top with egg wash and sprinkle with some dried rosemary.

6.  Bake  for 20-25 minutes or until the top is golden brown and sounds hollow when you tap on it.

SOURCE:  A Hint of Honey via Pinterest

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Non-Alcoholic Substitutions

I don't know about you, but as a cook who doesn't partake of alcoholic beverages, I have a hard time figuring out what to substitute in recipes that call for wine and liquor.  I was looking through a cookbook the other day to figure out my next blog post and found this list of substitutions that seem to be pretty good.  It's a little lengthy, but comprehensive.


  • Liquor/Liqueurs--sub an equal amount of fruit juice
  • Wine--sub equal amount of fruit juice plus 1 T. vinegar


  • Liquor/Wine--sub equal amount of liquid: chicken, beef or vegetable broth, or even water.  Add 1 T. of red wine vinegar or white vinegar for a little zing.  Also consider available non-alcoholic wines, but still add a vinegar to balance their sweetness.


  • 2 T. Grand Marnier or other orange-flavored liqueur--sub 2 T. unsweetened orange juice concentrate.
  • 2 T. Rum/Brandy--sub water, white grape juice, or apple juice.
  • 1/4 c.or more White Wine--sub equal measure of chicken broth, vegetable broth, or clam juice (If      using non-alcoholic wine, add 1 T. vinegar to cut the sweetness.
  • 1/4 c. or more Red Wine--sub equal amount of chicken broth, beef broth, vegetable broth, clam juice, flavored vinegar, fruit juices, apples cider, and non-alcoholic wines (remember the vinegar trick).


  • 2 T. Grand Marnier or other orange-flavored liqueur--sub 2 T. orange juice and 1/2 t. orange extract.
  • 2 T. Rum/Brandy--sub 1/2 to 1 t. rum or brandy extract for recipes in which liquid amount is not crucial.  Add water, white grape juice, or apple juice, if necessary, to get the right amount of liquid.
  • 2 T. Amaretto--sub 1/4 to 1/2 t. almond extract.
  • 2 T. Sherry or Bourbon--sub 1 to 2 t. vanilla extract.
  • 2 T. Chocolate Liqueur--sub 1/2 to 1 t. chocolate extract plus 1/2 to 1 t. coffee granules dissolved in 2 T. water (I don't drink coffee either, so if you know of another way, let me know)
  • For 1/4 c. or more port wine/sweet sherry/rum/ brandy/fruit-flavored liqueur--sub equal measure of orange juice or apples juice plus 1 t. of corresponding flavored extract or vanilla extract.

Source: Just a list stuck in my cookbook.
Image courtesy of